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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 157 (some duplicates have been removed)
we set out to do. because of you, osama bin laden is no more. [applause] because of you, al qaeda's top ranks have been hammered. the core of al qaeda in afghanistan and pakistan is on the way to defeat. >> president obama with the marines this week. osama bin laden is gone, but his number two man is still around, and so is his personal assistant, who has planned an attack on american targets, leading to the closing of 19 embassies and the state department has ordered nonessential staff to leave the u.s. consulate and issued a travel warning. colby, the game is not over. >> the game is not over and it raises questions about the information that led to the decision and how we got it. it goes back to the mega-data that has been gathered. does it suggest there is value in what they have done? the activity that we have been reading about -- there is fruit from it that allows them to take the action they have taken? the threat has not gone away. >> how about this -- we do not want another benghazi? is that the message? >> it is clear part of the motivation was because of benghazi, the
. al qaeda is on the run and osama bin laden is dead. >> it may be a new al qaeda, a more splintered al qaeda, but they don't, certainly, when you look at the most broad response in american history, you're closing 21 embassies, certainly don't seem to be on the run. >> i think we've got to be on the alert for this. yes, we did take out osama bin laden. and as soon as the next chief pops up we take him out in the central node of al qaeda. it's still dangerous. and it can transform itself. you've got people who spend their lives plotting how to hurt americans. so until every one of those people is eliminated or they change their motivations, we've got a continuing issue. i think what the president was trying to say was the central nervous system of the old al qaeda has been broken and broken down and decapitated with getting rid of osama bin laden. and that's a good thing, but it's not the end of it. >> thanks to each of you. >>> as many of you know, we have devoted much of our program over the past year to the benghazi attacks and their afteras a matter of fact. please join us on tuesda
the country's capacity for self inflicted damage must have astounded even osama bin laden and points out there is always a nightmare of acquiring use -- terrorists acquiring and using these weapons of mass destruction that nothing would give them greater satisfaction that we focus obsessively on the remote possibility and restrict our lives and our liberties accordingly. guest: i think this is always a difficult debate. i think if we step back and look at it, since 9/11, the united states even though we are one of the most open and free countries , has remained, frankly, open and free. we continued to have super bowl's and people travel abroad and robust trade with our allies around the world. so this type of limited action, i would use the analogy of it is like a hurricane. forecasting weather a potential storm and we're battening down the hatches and a few limited places. if the storm passes, great, but this administration is leaning forward and a way i think is professionally responsible and they are being advised not just by political advisers but also the cia -- one of my old agenci
is on the run and osama bin laden is dead. >> reporter: the white house aide said the cia director and other officials noted al qaeda affiliates were gaining steam. >> did he give the full picture to the people in the campaign about the threat of al qaeda, when that was his talking about again and again? >> it is indisputable the elimination of osama bin laden was a major accomplishment in the effort against al qaeda. we have been clear and the president has been clear that the threat from al qaeda very much remains. >> reporter: republicans know al qaeda in the arabian peninsula is its deadliest affiliate of all. >> al qaeda is in many ways stronger than 9/11, because it mutated and spread and come at us different directions. >> reporter: tense times in the mid east, where the u.s. is having talks in egypt with a jailed senior leader of muslim brotherhood, amid fears the government is losing control of key cities. >> that will allow the sinai to become as you said wild west of terrorism where groups like al qaeda and hamas can coordinate and plot attacks. >> reporter: as the egyptian govern
, the intelligence that sparked all this was a communication from osama bin ladin's replacement, ayman al zawahiri to the head of the al qaeda arm in yemen. the terrorist leaders discussed plotting an attack to coincide with a in muslim holy day this week. this afternoon nbc news is reporting that one reason the u.s. reacted so aggressively is because al qaeda operatives said they wanted an attack that, quote, would change the balance of power in the region. well, as american counter terrorist officials are dealing with this threat, some on the right are using it to hit the president as weak on national security. big surprise there. take a look what bill kristol and former senator jim demint said this weekend on fox. >> four years ago, president obama gave a much heralded speech, his outreach to the muslim world. now four years later we're closing embassies throughout the arab world. a year ago he said al qaeda is on the run. now we seem to be on the run. i'm not criticizing the decision to close the embassies. that's probably the right thing to do for the sake of trying to save american lives and
. >> this will now drive them to couriers, which were what led us to osama bin laden but were very hard to find. >> reporter: on tuesday, the u.s. found four al qaeda suspects and killed them, looking for the group's chief bomb maker. despite a worldwide terror alert, president obama on leno last night said there's really no reason for americans to avoid their international travel plans, betty, he says that you can go, just be careful. >> absolutely. good advice. thank you. >>> he addressed everything from edward snowden, to lunch with hillary clinton. >> if there's a lawbreaker or an alleged lawbreaker in their country, we evaluate it and we try to work with them. they didn't do that with us, and in some ways it's reflective of some underlying challenges that we've had with russia lately. i think putin and russia have a big stake in making sure the olympics work, and i think they understand that for most of the countries that participate in the olympics, you know, we wouldn't tolerate gays and lesbians being treated differently. she had that post-administration glow. when folks leave the white
:00 a.m. that the takedown of osama bin laden occurred. someone with my left had a lot to do with that. more on that later. a special welcome to the ambassador of
. these are armed attacks with r.p.g.'s, et cetera. it does make you wonder the kill of osama bin laden, a profound moral victory, didn't end the effectiveness of al qaeda. this is being manned by al zawahari who is at large. maybe we didn't end al qaeda by going -- >>steve: maybe we busted into the centralized al qaeda h.q. now it's fragmented all over. some are wondering whether or not you look at what happened in benghazi, where they killed four brave americans, clearly some sort of al qaeda-linked terror attack, and who's been held accountable. nobody. even though we knew, "the new york times" talked to some of the suspects and others have since then, we haven't done anything. now some are wondering is this a gross overreaction to some intel? susan rice, who is currently running the n.s.a., reportedly sees similarities trying to make sure this is not a repeat of what happened last year. here's lindsay graham and bill crystal. >> they are taking the right approach to this. benghazi was a complete failure. the threats were real there, reporting was real and we dropped the ball. we've learned from
even osama bin laden. there is always the nightmare of acquiring, terrorists acquiring weapons of mass destruction, but nothing would give the terrorists enemies greater satisfaction than that we focus obsessively on the remote possibility and restrict our lives and our liberties accordingly. guest: this is always a difficult debate. i think that if we step back d look at it since 9/11, the united states, even though we're one of the most open and free countries has remained, frankly, open and free. we have continued to have super bowls. we continue to have our people travel abroad. we have robust trade with our allies around the world. so this type of limited action, i would use an analogy of it's like a hurricane. we have some weather forecasting that says will is going to be a potential storm. we're battening down the hatches in a few limiting places. if the storm passes, great, but this administration is leaning forward in a way that i think is professionally responsible and they're being advised by not just their political advisors, but also by the c.i.a., one of the old agencies,
to retreat from the world. we don't get terrorized. because of you, osama bin laden is no more. [ cheers ] >> because of you, al qaeda's top ranks have been hammered. >> over overnight in yemen which is on high alert the u.s. conducted its sixth punishing drone strike in ten days. the yemeni government said six suspected al qaeda members were killed. 29 suspected al qaeda terrorists have been taken out by u.s. drones in the past ten days. new throats from al qaeda forced the evacuation of the u.s. embassy in yemen. among those outposts shut down through at least saturday by terror concerns. i wagood morning. >> good morning. >> the president says al qaeda has been hammered. he said they are on their way to defeat. from a messaging standpoint, how tricky is it to send that reassuring message at the same time you are evacuating americans? >> i think they are te directly linked. there is clear intelligence that the administration has received that these embassies are being targeted overseas. there is a clear oh effort by the administration to use the drone strikes against what they see as a
senior al qaeda leaders and no warning since the killing of osama bin laden in may of 2011. something serious they've heard. i also think this is the reaction of the benghazi scandal. the administration does want to look like it's lax on security and not being aggressive enough. i think they're also being very, very broad in terms of shutting down so many embassies to be careful politically. >> if something else were to happen, of course, a lot of people critical of not having done enough. mark, i want to turn to you on this. we heard a lot over the last decade about how much al qaeda has been weakened by the war on terror, but does this contradict that? do these closures suggest they are stronger than we've been led to believe? >> i don't want to say it's contradicted and david has put his finger on it. the fact of the matter is we've always known despite the killing of osama bin laden that there's been a series of franchise organizations directly related to al qaeda. they've been in the caucuses in the north africa and the al qaeda which committed attacks in amgeria, as well as in l
to the dramatic move. turns out, it wasn't just an intercepted message between sth man who replaced osama bin laden and the yemen leader. there's a leader of al qaeda in the arabian peninsula and what we had heard before is that there was a call between the two. but now we're hearing something different. in fact, it's an exclusive report that we're getting today that perhaps more than 20 al qaeda operatives from around the world were on some sort of conference call and we were able to listen in on that. one of the reporters who broke that story is joining us now. john is the senior correspondent for national security and politics for "newsweek" and the daily beat. i don't want to ruin your story but tell our viewers what they need to know about this supposed conference call. >> right. so we know that u.s. intelligence has been monitoring multiple threat streams and multiple communication streams between al qaeda's core leadership in pakistan and their associates in yemen but what we're able to report new today with that, the call that actually led the worldwide terror alert and the closing of
of going after al qaeda directly. i don't think the administration that got osama bin laden, rhetorical bluster didn't bring oun osama bin laden, actual intelligence and aggressive maneuvers ron insana side of pakistan did. i don't think the former dictators in libya or in egypt would think that this president has been weak. i think what we've seen is a president who has tried to get the united states to conform and comport with the sort of moral standing that -- >> i don't think -- now i feel i need to counter on the other side, becae the fact of the matter is barack obama has adopted policies that i think have actually been less targeted. he will fire drones into countries where we aren't even at war. when we had a plan, a policy, a program that would allow us to go and snatch terrorists out like khalid sheikh mohammed. bring them out without killing their 4-year-old daughters, without killing their grandmothers, without killing everybody in the general vicinity. and i've got to say, nothing that he has done has made us comport to international standards more than under george w. bush
know, just a year ago, boasting al-qaeda is on the run, osama bin laden is dead, and now an unprecedented closure of 22 embassies. the travel alert, which lasts for a month, which incidentally, i'm not sure people understand, the state department hates to do that. this is the highest level -- the travel advisories they do routinely. travel alert, every host government dislikes that. it cuts tourism. they're objecting to the ambassadors there. the ambassadors are cabling back to the state department, travel alert, are you sure we have to do that? for the u.s. government, the state department to issue a travel alert for the next month means about the threat is serious. >> chris: senator demint, the president was criticized heavily last september after benghazi for not doing enough. is it fair now to criticize him for doing too much? >> well, it's clear that al-qaeda may be more of a threat to us they were before 9/11 now. we don't know exactly what all the intelligence is, but as you've heard from a lot of the experts on both sides the aisle in congress, there's a real thre
al qaeda is on the run and osama bin laden is dead. now an unprecedented closure and a travel alert which lasts for a month. the state department hates to do that the. the travel advisory they do. travel alert, every host government dislikes that. it cuts tourism. they are objecting to the ambassadors there cabling back to the state department saying, travel alert, are you sure we have to do that? to issue a travel alert for the next month means the threat is serious. >> senator demint the president was criticized heavily last september after benghazi for not doing enough. is it fair to criticize him for doing too much? >> it's clear al qaeda may be more of a threat to us than they were before 9/11. as you have heard from the experts on both sides he aisle in congress, there is a very real threat there. i'm not questioning what he's doing. i think what bill is saying is true. our attempt to placate parts of the world, reset whether it's russia or somewhere else are clearly not working. the perception of weakness in the administration is encouraging this kind of behavior. >> juan, wh
and others but it's a terrible thing that -- just a year ago, boasting al qaeda is on the run and osama bin laden is dead. now an unprecedented closure of 22 embassies. >> i'm not questioning what he's doing. i think what bill is saying is true is our attempt to placate parts of the world reset to whether it's russia or somewhere else are clearly not working. the perception of weakness in this administration is encouraging this kind of behavior. >> of course, those were extreme hawks. someone needs to tell jim demint al qaeda doesn't care what you're relationship is with russia. for more on how washington reacted, i'm joined by senior correspondent michael crowley with me and "the washington post" opinion writer jonathan capehart. i guess what's interesting here, skrungt you start, it's the quick almost rabble-rousing political hysteria. instead of joining in which was the initial impulse of people like peter cink and lindsey graham was to join forces and say we've got a unique threat coming out of yemen. orders passed from pakistan. and deal with the issue at hand. instead they reverted im
time they did this, when romney called him an apiecer, obama came out and said tell that to osama bin laden and the 15 leaders of al qaeda i've taken off the field. the notion that this guy is somehow appeasing our enemies is so preposterous. >> do you think they have polled on this, the neocons, they figure after the embarrassment of iraq, they wanted to fight the war. george w. wanted to fight it, and the vice president wanted to fight it. they all wanted to fight it. okay. they decided that we have sort of forgotten that, and now they're coming back. bolton is back, kristol is back. when they say retaliation, their idea of retaliation after 9/11, steve, was going into iraq. retaluation. what does that mean? >> i have never gotten the impression that their world views were radically altered by what happened in the last decade, after the invasion of iraq. i don't think the world view was changed. i think they sense an opportunity within the republican party, the argument in the republican party over foreign policy. whenever they see an opportunity to connect their agenda to oppositio
with terrorists, killing osama bin laden. en even this question of al qaeda's number two, ayman al zawahiri, there was a meeting the president attend wrd he wanted more vigilance in this fight. as tom donnelly would tell me, obama said here's the deal. i want this hunt for osama bin laden and ayman al zawahiri to come to the front of the line. i worry that the trail has gone cold. this has to be our top priority. you need to ensure that we have expended every effort to take down the top leadership of al qaeda, especially these two individuals. in light of your criticism about overreaction, there is still a very specific threat and a very specific operator who is atop these organizations. >> and there continue to be a specific threat and there will continue to be terrorism as there has been for as long as human history exists. terrorism is simply the weapon by which the weak engage the strong. and what they do is they cause the strong, in this case us, to overreact. we are the one who is went into iraq and spent about a trillion and a half dollars doing it, losing, what, 2,500 -- 4,500 young
of lebanon. meanwhile, osama bin laden was watching these events unfold and essentially learned the lesson that america was cowardly, that they couldn't take a punch in the nose and that emboldened him to later on launch the attacks that we know he launched. i keep coming back to that because to me it seems like we have to figure out what type of strikes, what targets to strike. but isn't the bottom line here that the president said we have this red line of chemical weapons and if you cross that there will be enormous consequences. if we fail to deliver those enormous consequences, we lose all of our credibility in the reason gone, we lose all of our ability to act as a deterrent. iran is watching this and learning perhaps the same lessons that osama bin laden learned in 1983. >> krystal, the fact is international law was violated. the president's statement of crossing the red line occurred six to eight months ago. syria's used chemical weapons some months ago. in fact, some reports indicate that he's used this some number of times, even 100 times on a much limited scale. the red line bein
we have made, getting osama bin laden, putting al qaeda between afghanistan and pakistan back on its heels that this radical, you know, violent extremism is still out there. >> jeremy, is this kind of a tricky line for him to walk, talking about this? of course, reminding everyone that the death of osama bin laden was under his watch but you have closings and evacuations that send a different message. >> that's right. i think jay leno asked the right question when he brought up ben ghazi. i think that looms large now over every decision that has to do with our installations overseas. the last thing that this white house wanted to have to deal with, i'm sure, is another attack on that scale. so, i mean, while al qaeda is definitely on the run, this is a reminder that, you know, while the president is trying to move on to other issues, whether it be housing policy, the environment, what have you, terrorism and the fight of it overseas is still a huge part of his portfolio. >> yeah, he answered a lot of questions. jay leno really playing the part of a reporter yesterday, including askin
. that's where osama bin laden was born and raised. this is something, it's an organization with a lot of offshoots. it's a dispersed organization. it's intended to function that way so that eliminating one or two or even many of its top leaders don't prevent the rest of the organization from operating. and that's been true from its inception. >> that is not very encouraging. let me ask you this. as long as we're doing this reality test, and we all should be aware this is why we're talking about this as our lead story, what do you think is happening here at home? is al qaeda on our shores? >> well, i think this is one of the risks that we have to take seriously. particularly now in the wake of the boston marathon bombing on april 15th. the government has not said that there's a risk here. but you have to believe that if al qaeda thought it could strike again in america, it would certainly like to try and do so. this is something that i think we should be paying close attention to. i think it should heighten our appreciation of our intelligence gathering assets like the electronic surve
drive them to currier which is what led us to osama bin laden but were very hard to find. >> reporter: the u.s. found four al qaeda suspects and killed them looking for the group's chief bomb maker. there is a worldwide travel alert for this entire month. the president said if you're planning to travel abroad, don't put it off just because of that alert. the point of that alert is to warn americans to be careful, be vigilant, and travel smart. >> all right, tracie potts live in washington, thank you. >>> on "the tonight show," the president talked to jay about everything from edwards snowden to lunch with hillary clinton. >> if there's a lawbreaker or an allegeded lawbreaker in their country, we evaluate and try to work with them. they didn't do that with us. and in some ways it's reflective of underlying challenges that we've had with russia lately. i think putin and russia have a big stake in making sure the olympics work. i think they understand that for most of the countries that participate in the olympics, we wouldn't tolerate gays and lesbians being treated differently. she had
the world and does not get terrorized. >> because of you, osama bin laden is no more. because of you, al qaeda's top ranks have been hammered. even as we decimated the al qaeda leadership that attacked us on 9/11, al qaeda affiliates and like minded extremists still threaten our homeland. still threaten our diplomatic facilities. still threaten our businesses abroad. and we've had to take these threats seriously and do all we can to confront them. >> meanwhile, those heavy u.s. drone strikes in yemen continue. according to "the new york times," three strikes this morning have left three people dead. another wednesday killed seven. and a targeted attack on tuesday killed four people, all said to be working for al qaeda. >>> president obama also addressed another critical issue within the arms forces, its alarming rate of sexual assaults. it follows a recent report that as many as 26,000 instances of the crime went unreported last year, a 35% jump from 2010. the pentagon is reviewing records to screen for past instances of alcohol-related offenses, child abuse and unwanted sexual contact.
qaeda's central control has ebbed and flowed. one of the geniuses of what osama bin laden set up, really, was local groups feeding on local grievances, taking advantage of local circumstances to advance the larger cause, which they can unite around. and as they apparently did in the case of this threat in yemen. al qaeda's not like a corporation or a division -- army division in the military. it's a different kind of organization. we have to recognize that. >> it seems that the leader of al qaeda now is not on the run. apparently the reports say we intercepted some type of phone conversation, a conference call of some sort between him and maybe 20 al qaeda officials. maybe it was an internet chat. maybe there were skyping. that sounds silly that al qaeda would be on the phone with a conference call. what do you think led to this tip to close these facilities and basically how do we know as i asked originally that the coast is clear? >> i think there was probably other information in addition to this conference call. i have to stay, just to stop right there, whether it was a conference ca
had been worth despite osama bin lauden. where do we draw the line? >> i think not just the ambiguous outcomes in the wars in afghanistan but also the libyan situation in which they thought we were doing good in the world, and we helped overthrow gaddafi, and then we had ambassador chris stevens, who was really a hero in the benghazi area killed in that very city when he was ambassador and then they have seen egypt and yemen erupt and i think they writely believed that america's apparent america'sability to flinfluencee evenltsdz would be limited and it's costly to try. >> almost a year anniversary of the benghazitac. it was airstrikes on libya. that was what many are proposing now for syria, and now, it seems like the situation in libya is much worse than it was under gaddafi in certain ways. >> i think any time you get involved in a war, you cannot entirely predict the outcome. so i think there is certainly a war weariness in the u.s. but a war wariness as well. people really are worried about these sorts of things. but i do believe that the use of chemical weapons, the use of these
in afghanistatn and pakistan is on the way to defeat. >> president obama with the marines this week. osama bin laden is gone, but his number two man is still around, and so is his personal assistant, who has planned an attack on american targets, leading to the closing of 19 embassies and the stat department has ordered nonessenential staff to leave te u.s. consulate and issued a travel warning. colby, the game is not over. >> the game is not over and raises questions about the information that led to the decision and how we got it. it goes back to the mega-data that has been gathered. does it suggest there is value in what they have done? the activity that we have been reading about -- there is fruit from it that allows them to take the action they have taken? the threat has not gone away. >> how about this -- we do not want another benghazi? is that the message? >> it islear part ofof the motivation was because of benghazizi, the embarrassment, e fact the sto will not go away and we dnot have explanations as to why the warnings were ignored, etc., but there is a larger problem in that al qae
don't know. as much as we think we know, the fact that osama bin laden is dead, terrific, that broke up core al qaeda. but no one capable of 9-11, that's a dangerous road to go down and say that publicly. they are still very fearful someone is going to get a body bomb on an airplane or another printer cartridge that will actually work to bring down an airplane. and frankly, who knows what other plots are out there? i don't mean to sound doom and gloom but i don't think we know what we don't know. even though our intelligence is pretty terrific. gwen: and international surveillance. we're not going to give that up -- >> and we had al-zarqawi who is bin laden's number two guy and number one guy in core al qaeda if you want to call it that, communicating with the head of al qaeda on the arabian peninsula. that tells you something, too. gwen: was there any sense at the white house, alexis, that part of what drove this was in the way that edward snowden drove the announcements about surveillance today that the -- the fallout from benghazi may have driven some of his decision to shut down
truck bombings. it also marked the first time many americans ever heard the name osama bin laden. of course, september 11th is a critical date not only for the 2001 attacks on america but also the deadly attack on the u.s. mission in benghazi, libya, one year ago. the state department says it's closing 21 u.s. embassies and consulates on sunday out of an abundance of caution. one official telling us the shutdown could be extended beyond sunday. here is our senior international correspondent arwa damon. she's outside the american embassy in cairo. >> reporter: behind this wall is one of the roads that leads to the u.s. embassy in cairo. normally the embassy would have been open on a sunday. it is a working day here. it will, however, be closed because of those security concerns. in the past there have been demonstrations here. there have been mobs, angry mobs, who have gathered trying to attack the embassy. september 11th of last year, for example, an incensed crowd, angered over the film that insulted prophet mohammed, tried to attack the embassy and it was the same day we saw th
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 157 (some duplicates have been removed)